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   000: The True Origin
   001: Wild Child
   002: The Origin
   003: Young Logan
   004: The Amazing Skunk-Bear
   005: Sabretooth and Silver Fox
   006: The Lost Years
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   010: Landau, Luckman and Lake
   011: Team X Beginnings
   012: Logan, Creed and North
   013: Secret Agent Man, eh?
   014: Weapon X: The Origin(s)
   015: Weapon X: Adamantium
   016: Memory Implants
   017: The Ultimate Warrior
   018: Weapon X: Escape
   019: The Hudsons
   020: License to Kill
   021: Department H: Weapon X
   022: Department H: The Flight
   023: The Best There Is
   024: The Wolverine
   025: The X-Men
   026: Death in the Family
   027: The Phoenix
   028: Where No X-Men Has Gone
   029: Missing, Presumed Dead

The Wolverine Files

029 - Missing, Presumed Dead

The Day the X-Men Died

John Byrne and Terry Austin, X-Men #114.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

Classic X-Men # 17/2 (Jan 1988) - “A Taste for Vengeance”

Writer: Chris Claremont, Artist: John Bolton

      On the streets of Manhattan, Mesmero, a green-skinned mutant with the power of hypnotism, takes control of Jean Grey and her mind. He then directs her to use her telepathic abilities at Xavier's mansion to seize control of Nightcrawler, Banshee, Colossus, and Cyclops. Storm unleashes a lightning bolt through the mansion roof before she succumbs, a sign that alerts Wolverine to danger. As Wolverine approaches the mansion, Mesmero attempts to hypnotize him, but that proves to be no easy task. Wolverine eventually pretends to lose the battle of wills, but that ruse is short-lived, causing Mesmero to direct his mind-controlled X-Men against him. Wolverine valiantly holds his own against the might of Colossus, the monsoons of Storm, the sonic screams from Banshee, and the combined attacks of Cyclops, Nightcrawler and Jean Grey. In the end, the battle is too much for Wolverine who is forced to sheath his claws against his teammates and collapses in exhaustion as Mesmero tires of the monotonous fighting. Bored, Mesmero strikes up a plan to use the hypnotized X-Men as circus performers and freaks, thus humiliating the X-Men and making a tidy profit in the process.

     We learn just how effective a fighter Wolverine is (by holding his own against the entire team of X-Men) and how strong his willpower is (he never truly gives in to the hypnosis that ensnares the rest of the team).

X-Men Unlimited #13/1 (Apr 2006) – “Blind Love”

Writer: Hugh Sterbakov; Artist: Sean Scoffield

      With his mutant powers gone in the aftermath of House of M, Mesmero remembers Wolverine, Phoenix, Colossus, Cyclops, Nightcrawler and Banshee in full costume at his mercy. This is surely a reference to his first (and only) encounter with this set of X-Men, but the X-Men are in civilian garb when he battles them. This is either another game that Mesmero played before he took them to the circus or an idyllic memory of the events.

 

X-Men #111 (Jun 1978) – “Mindgames”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

      Beast, an original member of the X-Men, is alerted to the X-Men's disappearance by Lorna Dane, another former X-Men. Finding Xavier's mansion deserted, the blue-furred Beast uses Cerebro to track the X-Men to a circus in Sullivan County, Texas. There the X-Men are part of a freak show, with Wolverine enchained as the “Man-Beast of the Yukon .” While trying to free Jean and Scott from Mesmero's hypnotic control, Beast is discovered and captured by Mesmero's men. Logan, nearly catatonic from the failed hypnotic efforts of Mesmero, watches as Beast is savagely beaten, an event that sparks a primal urge inside of Wolverine to be free. Snapping the strongest chains of steel that money can buy, Wolverine breaks free of the mind control. Threatening one of Mesmero's guards, Wolverine regains his costume and decides to free Jean first. A hypnotized Scott Summers is Wolverine's first obstacle, and he decks the leader of the X-Men with one punch. Wolverine then slaps Jean in the face repeatedly to break the hypnosis, an act that awakes an angry Phoenix , who nearly kills Wolverine. Freeing the rest of the new X-Men, Phoenix , Wolverine, Cyclops, Colossus, Nightcrawler, Storm and Banshee make short order of Mesmero's men and prepare to confront Mesmero within his circus wagon. But inside, they find that Mesmero and Beast are already unconscious, courtesy of Magneto!

     I must admit that this is this issue that made me a lifelong Wolverine fan. The way he finally snaps his unbreakable chains, muscles straining. His escape enabled by threatening to pop his claws through the guard's neck and brains. And, finally, dropping the sanctimonious Scott Summers with a single backhanded punch. In my opinion, it was moments like these that caused him to be as popular as he is now, some 25 years later.

Wolverine at his best

John Byrne and Terry Austin, X-Men #111.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

 

Classic X-Men #18 (Feb 1988) – “Magneto Triumphant”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: Kieron Dwyer; Inker: Terry Austin

     Confronting Magneto, Wolverine contemplates ending the battle by gutting the evil mutant with his claws.

 

X-Men #112 (Aug 1978) – “Magneto Triumphant”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     As Magneto threatens the X-Men and a now conscious Beast from within the small circus wagon, Wolverine has to be physically restrained from attacking Magneto by the rest of the X-Men. It is soon revealed that Magneto has quietly levitated the wagon (and its occupants) several miles above the ground and is hurtling them towards some unknown destination. With the knowledge that the X-Men are helpless to attack, Magneto taunts Wolverine, who again needs to be held back against his will. Encasing the wagon within a magnetic bubble, Magneto transports them into an Antarctic volcano to his secret base buried beneath the lava pool. Once inside, the wagon explodes sending the X-Men flying and knocking out Wolverine on impact. Magneto slowly defeats the X-Men one by one, ending with Phoenix , just as Wolverine comes to. Sneaking up from behind, Wolverine only manages to cut through Magneto's cape with his claws. Magneto responds by taking magnetic control of Wolverine's claws and pummels him into unconsciousness with his own fists. As Wolverine and the rest of the X-Men awake, they find themselves bound to computerized prison chairs that regress their nervous systems to those of six-month old infants. In other words, the X-Men's bodies are effectively paralyzed while their unimpaired minds can merely watch and wait. An apt prison devised by Magneto who was forced to endure a similar regression to childhood by the X-Men's mentor, Charles Xavier.

     According to John Byrne, Wolverine was especially surprised when Magneto took control of his claws “… since Adamantium is non-magnetic. But Magneto… is not just dealing with metal anymore – he can control anything which generates an electro-magnetic field, which includes the human body. That's how he was able to… manipulate Wolverine's claws.”[1]

 

X-Men #113 (Sept 1978) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

      A week following their imprisonments, the X-Men are at sanity's edge, as they are doted on by the patronizing mechanized Nanny, designed to treat them as six-month old babies.

 

Classic X-Men #19 (Mar 1988) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: Kieron Dwyer; Inker: Terry Austin

     Wolverine's inability to move is especially hard on his psyche. Every day imprisoned brings him closer to slipping into a berserker rage and a permanent animalistic state.

  Magneto by John Byrne

John Byrne and Terry Austin, X-Men #111.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

X-Men #113 (Sept 1978) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     Trained as a thief, Storm possessed the coordination of a young girl by the age of six months and is able to pick the lock on her chair. After she releases the rest of the X-Men, Magneto returns to the Antarctic volcano base, alerted by a malfunctioning Nanny. But with an extraordinarily well-coordinated attack, the X-Men batter Magneto across the complex, Wolverine chomping at the bit the entire time. When Wolverine finally does get his chance, he digs his claws into Magneto's back. As the X-Men continue their onslaught, the complex supports begin to shatter, lava pouring through the cracks.

 

X-Men/Dr. Doom ‘98 (1998) – “Doom Quest”

Writer: Jorge Gonzalez; Penciler: Aaron Lopestri; Inker: Art Thibert & Jaime Mendoza

     Shortly after Magneto's first public appearance in 1963, Dr. Doom employs his time machine to move forward in time to document Magneto's future exploits. Behind a cloaked time platform, Doom watches as Magneto's Antarctic volcanic complex fills with lava. Phoenix does notice Doom's presence, but the collapse of the roof ends their brief confrontation.

 

X-Men #113 (Sept 1978) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     When the ceiling collapses, Phoenix and Beast are separated from the rest of the X-Men, and Magneto escapes, quite the worse for wear. While Phoenix and Beast miraculously survive, the rest of the X-Men, Wolverine included, apparently perish during the collapse.

 

     The cliffhanger events of X-Men #113 left the impression that Wolverine and the rest of the new X-Men died during the collapse of Magneto's Antarctic base. In X-Men #114, Hank McCoy and Jean Grey are the only ones rescued in Antarctica by the United States Navy helicopter and later inform Professor Xavier of the new X-Men's untimely demise.

 

Classic X-Men #20 (Apr 1988) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: Kieron Dwyer; Inker: Terry Austin

     As the ceiling of Magneto's underground complex collapses, Cyclops directs the new X-Men towards a crevasse free from the lava. Using Wolverine's animal senses as a guide, Cyclops blasts through the walls in a south by southeast direction, while Storm creates an ice wall to protect their rear from the advancing lava. Slowly but surely, the X-Men advance and finally proceed far enough for them to survive the exploding central core of Magneto's complex. Running short on air, Banshee uses his sonic blasts to continue their advance through the rock, leaving Wolverine deaf from ruptured eardrums.

 

X-Men #114 (Oct 1978) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     After 24 non-stop hours of digging, the X-Men finally reach the surface and find themselves in a surprisingly warm tropical habitat miraculously nestled in Antarctica , a valley known as the Savage Land. Banshee and Storm take off into the air to help clear her claustrophobia, but Banshee is shocked when he is grabbed by a giant pterosaur. Colossus hurls Wolverine at the dinosaur with a “Fastball Special,” and the feisty mutant quickly makes mincemeat of the flying creature, guiding its dying carcass gently to the ground. Cyclops tries to chew out Wolverine on his dangerous rescue methods, but Wolverine fires back that he did save Banshee's life. Banshee intercedes and directs the group towards a human village he sighted some 20 miles south. The village of the Fall People welcomes the tired mutants and gives them food and shelter for the next few weeks. There the X-Men relax and grieve for Hank McCoy and Jean Grey, who they mistakenly believe perished in the collapse of Magneto's complex.

Wolverine versus a pterosaur

John Byrne and Terry Austin, X-Men #114.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

 

Classic X-Men #21/2 (May 1988) – “First Love”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Artist: John Bolton

     As the X-Men's stay with the villagers continues, they learn that the Savage Land is inhabited by a wide variety of dinosaurs that miraculously survived the eons in this unlikely tropical paradise. Wolverine and the rest of the X-Men also learn first hand how truly dangerous the valley is when they take part in a Fall People funeral for Shakani, a young woman slain by a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

 

X-Men #114 (Oct 1978) – “Showdown”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     Two of the village women escort Peter, who invites Wolverine to join them on a tour of the Savage Land . Wolverine declines and repairs what is left of his costume, hinting that the women's tour is probably meant only for Peter. Now alone, Wolverine stares at his torn photograph of Jean Grey and silently grieves her loss. His thoughts, however, are interrupted by Storm's scream and staggering lightning bolt. Wolverine, now in costume, joins Cyclops, Nightcrawler and Banshee only to find Storm unconscious at the feet of human-looking pterosaur, an old X-Men villain, Sauron, who gains his powers by feeding on mutant energy.

X-Men #115 (Nov 1978) – “Visions of Death”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     At the sight of Storm unconscious at the feet of Sauron, Wolverine lunges at the humanoid pterosaur, attempting to disembowel him. Cyclops, who has fought Sauron before, tries to stop Wolverine, but Sauron glides away from Wolverine's deadly claws and locks eyes with him, instantly hypnotizing Wolverine into believing that demons (the X-Men) are attacking Jean Grey (Sauron). Wolverine turns and launches himself at Cyclops who drops Wolverine with an optic blast. As the rest of the X-Men attack Sauron, Nightcrawler checks on Wolverine but is decked for his efforts. Turning his attention back to Cyclops, Wolverine hesitates, realizing that something is amiss. Cyclops takes that moment to blast Wolverine again, sending him flying into the bush. The X-Men quickly defeat Sauron who transforms back into his human form, Karl Lykos. Wolverine comes to and grabs Lykos, but is greeted by a Tarzan-like figure, Ka-Zar, and his saber-toothed tiger Zabu. Before long, tempers are calmed, and Ka-Zar, the lord of the Savage Land , takes everyone to the village council house. There, Karl Lykos explains that the god-like Garokk the Petrified Man has been resurrected and is threatening to destroy the Savage Land by building a grand metropolis in the central lake. Wolverine enthusiastically agrees to help stop Garokk, but Cyclops intercedes, explaining that the X-Men must return to protect Professor Xavier in case Magneto survived their previous battle. Wolverine is outraged, but the X-Men, nonetheless, prepare for departure. At the harbor where they are to depart, the X-Men find themselves icebound and unable to leave. Nightcrawler surprises Wolverine square with a snowball in the face, precipitating a friendly snowball fight. But they are interrupted by Ka-Zar's dire warning. The snowfall signifies that Garokk's city has thrown off the ecological balance of the Savage Land , and if it is not corrected soon, the Savage land will perish.

Wolverine versus Sauron

John Byrne and Terry Austin, X-Men #115.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

X-Men #116 (Dec 1978) – “To Save the Savage Land

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     On their way to reconnoiter Garokk's metropolis, the X-Men, Ka-Zar and Zabu are attacked by pterosaur-riding tribesmen loyal to Garokk. Cyclops, Colossus, Banshee and Ka-Zar are captured and taken to the city, forcing Wolverine into a leadership role. But first, Wolverine sits down and begins to commune with Zabu, explaining to the saber-toothed tiger that he needs to alert Ka-Zar's village of what happened. It becomes apparent to Nightcrawler when Zabu runs off that Wolverine was, in fact, communicating with the prehistoric cat.

 

Classic X-Men #22 (Jun 1988) – “To Save the Savage Land

Writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: Kieron Dwyer; Inker: Terry Austin

     Storm helps to hide Wolverine and Nightcrawler from the flying pterosaur patrols as they approach Garokk's domed metropolis.

 

X-Men #116 (Dec 1978) – “To Save the Savage Land

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     Wolverine discovers a sentry guarding the garbage facility in Garokk's metropolis and silently kills him from behind with his claws. Storm comments that Wolverine “…is like a great cat on the veldt. He strikes, there is no mercy in him.” As they venture inside, Wolverine is savagely bitten by a raptor-like dinosaur. Popping his claws through the dinosaur's skull, Wolverine kills the creature while Storm dispatches the rest of the pack with a flash flood. Before long, Wolverine, Storm and Nightcrawler make it to the edge of a prodigious indoor arena which serves as the execution grounds for the captive Cyclops, Colossus, Banshee and Ka-Zar. As Garokk pronounces judgment, Nightcrawler teleports and frees the captives. The ensuing battle sees Cyclops and Garokk matching eye blasts with such force that it destroys the entire domed complex. All make it to safety, save for Garokk whom Storm fails to save due to a severe bout of claustrophobia. When Banshee goes to check on her, Wolverine tells him to give her some time, “Think about it. She went down that hole to save a life. She came up empty-handed. Whatever happened down there. I figure it's somthin' she'd rather work out on her own.”

     Wolverine's apparent killing of the sentry outside the garbage facility of Garokk's metropolis generated a lot of controversy at the time. As Jim Shooter, Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics, declared, “I don't want the heroes killing people, and as far as I am concerned, Wolverine hasn't killed anyone.”[2]  But writer Chris Claremont noted, “As originally constructed in the plot, it was specifically set up as such a way that it was a wartime situation… The man had to be taken out swiftly, silently and permanently… It came down to Wolverine, and for Wolverine, it's a killing issue.”[3]  Artist John Byrne added, “The Savage Land was at war with Garokk and his people. Wolverine was one of us and he was one of them and Wolverine did just what he would have done in World War II.”[4]

 

Classic X-Men #22/2 (Jun 1988) – “Solice”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Artist: John Bolton

     The following day, Storm takes off from the village on her own to give herself some time alone. Ka-zar warns of the dangers of the Savage Land , but Wolverine retorts that Storm knows how to take care of herself.

 

X-Men #116 (Dec 1978) – “To Save the Savage Land

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     As the X-Men prepare to leave the Savage Land , Wolverine bids farewell to Zabu. Before long, the X-Men navigate their small wooden craft through Drake Passage, south of Cape Horn and into the teeth of the worst winter gale in over a hundred years.

 

X-Men #117 (Jan 1979) – “Psi War”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     The X-Men continue to navigate their tiny craft against the gale, utilizing Storm's weather control to calm the waters. Fortunately, the X-Men sight a Japanese ship, Jinguchi Maru, and are quickly taken aboard. Because the Jinguchi Maru is on a secret mission, the X-Men are unable to contact Professor Xavier until they reach Japan .

 

Classic X-Men #23 (Jul 1988) – “Psi Wars”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: Kieron Dwyer; Inker: Terry Austin

     With clear skies in the South Pacific, Wolverine reminisces about Jean Grey's apparent demise in the battle against Magneto. While he ruminates, Nightcrawler surprises him, and Wolverine nearly decapitates him.

 

X-Men #118 (Feb 1979) – “The Submergence of Japan

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Ric Villamonte

     Six weeks later, the X-Men, still aboard the Jinguchi Maru, reach Agarashima, Japan, only to find the city engulfed in flames. The X-Men quickly reach shore, assisting the rescue teams before approaching the Yoshida Ancestral Manor, the home of former teammate Sunfire. Because they lack proper identification, the X-Men attempt to sneak past the guards but are caught by Sunfire. When Sunfire orders the X-Men to be arrested, Misty Knight intercedes on behalf of the Japanese Prime Minister who requests their help. Wolverine wanders off to the Japanese Gardens and encounters a beautiful young Japanese girl, Mariko. Before he can introduce himself properly, an earthquake hits the Yoshida Ancestral Manor. Wolverine saves Mariko, as several Mandroids (combat suits designed to fight the Avengers superhero group) attack. The X-Men make quick work of the Mandroids (Wolverine tears open the head of one) and learn that Moses Magnum has threatened to sink Japan with his earthquake-inducing Magnum Force if he is not made ruler of Japan .

     In a classic scene, it is revealed that Wolverine is fluent in Japanese. Wolverine snags a Japanese newspaper and tells Cyclops that Agarashima was deserted because of an earthquake warning. When Cyclops comments that he didn't know Wolverine read Japanese, Wolverine responds, “You never asked.”

Wolverine and Mariko

John Byrne and Ric Villamonte, X-Men #118.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

 

X-Men #119 (Mar 1979) – “Twas the Night Before Christmas…”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     The X-Men are briefed by the Japanese government on Moses Magnum. The damage to Agarashima was a result of Moses Magnum's Magnum Force, and his threat to sink Japan is considered to be very real. But the Japanese government will not give in to Magnum's demands, so the X-Men and Sunfire are recruited to infiltrate Magnum's base in the volcanic islets in the Kuril Chain and stop Moses Magnum. When the X-Men break up into commando teams, Wolverine goes with Sunfire, Cyclops and Colossus to attack the base from below, tunneling through the Earth with Cyclops' optic blast and Sunfire's fire blasts. As they emerge from the tunnel, Moses Magnum greets them and decks Wolverine with one punch. Before long, Moses Magnum retreats to his earthquake generator and begins to power it up. The X-Men retreat and Banshee, pushing his sonic blasts beyond their limits, cancels out the Magnum Force, destroying the island in a huge explosion. When the X-Men are finally rescued, there is grave concern that Banshee may have burned out his powers.

 

Classic X-Men #25 (Sept 1988) – “Twas the Night Before Christmas…”

Writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: Kieron Dwyer; Inker: Terry Austin

     In Tokyo University Hospital, the X-Men hold vigil for Banshee, and before long, they receive word that Banshee will survive.

 

X-Men #119 (Mar 1979) – “Twas the Night Before Christmas…”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; writer: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     Ten days later, Banshee returns to the Yoshida Manor alone from the hospital, depressed that his friends were not there to meet him when he was released. As he enters the house, the X-Men greet him with a surprise Christmas party. After a warm welcome, Wolverine departs to see Mariko.

 

X-Men #120 (Apr 1979) – “Wanted: Wolverine! Dead or Alive!”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

     As the X-Men leave Japan , Wolverine gives Mariko a white chrysanthemum and reveals his real name, Logan , to her. Flying across the Pacific to return home at long last, the X-Men, aboard a private DC-10, run into severe weather and are forced to land in Calgary, Canada. On the runway, James Hudson as Vindicator orders the X-Men to turn over former Canadian agent Wolverine to Alpha Flight, a Canadian superhero team that he leads. When the X-Men try to take off, Sasquatch, the hairy super-powered strongman of the team, throws the DC-10 into an abandoned hangar. Storm creates a fog to help the X-Men to escape into the airport undetected, and when Vindicator investigates, the plane is empty. Once inside, the X-Men split up, but Alpha Flight quickly capture Nightcrawler, and Sasquatch grabs Wolverine, beating him unconscious.

 

X-Men #121 (May 1979) – “Shoot-Out at the Stampede”

Plotters: Chris Claremont & John Byrne; scripter: Chris Claremont; Penciler: John Byrne; Inker: Terry Austin

    Tracking Wolverine and Nightcrawler to the Calgary Stampede Grounds, Cyclops, Storm, Colossus break in and find Wolverine and Nightcrawler tied up. Before them stand Vindicator, Sasquatch and the rest of Alpha Flight: Shaman, an Indian medicine man capable of magic; Snowbird, a metamorph who can change into any animal; Northstar, a mutant possessing unbelievable speed; and his sister Aurora capable of generating burst of light and flying at high speeds. When Vindicator refuses to turn over Wolverine, a fight ensues, and Wolverine and Nightcrawler, playing possum, join the fray. As the teams battle, the blizzard created by Shaman begins to blow out of control, threatening the city of Calgary . Storm uses every ounce of her power to tame the raging tempest, and when Northstar drops her from behind when she lands, Cyclops begins to pummel Northstar. In an astounding moment, Wolverine stops Cyclops and ends the fight by going with Alpha Flight. The X-Men are allowed to leave the country after Wolverine enters an armored truck designed to withstand even Wolverine's claws. Once in U.S. airspace, Cyclops begins planning how to rescue Wolverine, but it stunned to find Wolverine already in the cockpit. As Wolverine notes, “The cage ain't been built that can hold me… Let's break out the drinkin' stuff an' celebrate ‘cause the X-Men are goin' home!”

Alpha Flight

John Byrne and Terry Austin, X-Men #121.

© and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

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[1]  Peter Sanderson, "Wolverine: The Evolution of a Character, " The Incredible Hulk and Wolverine #1, 1986.

[2]  Harry Broertjes, “Jim Shooter Interview,” The X-Men Chronicles , 1981.

[3]  “Interview with Chris Claremont,” The X-Men Companion , 1982.

[4]  “Interview with John Byrne,” The X-Men Companion II , 1982.

 
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Wolverine and other Marvel Comics' characters © and ™  by Marvel Characters, Inc.

Contents of "Wolverine Files" © by Joel "DiG" DiGiacomo